From the Chalk Face, School-wide Literacy, Training
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Struggling readers in the secondary English classroom

“They just can’t access the texts.”

This is one of the most frequent comments we hear when we train in schools or take workshops. All over the country, students with the potential to do better are held back because of weak reading skills. Often these students are articulate in conversation and have good listening comprehension. Sometimes they can decode accurately, but have little clear idea of the content that they have just read. Sometimes they have limited vocabulary and, even if they can decode the words on the page, they still cannot grasp the meaning of the text. Such problems have been even more acute for teachers and students since the reading demands of GCSE have become more challenging.

The old paradigm of labelling such children as having a ‘specific learning difficulty’ won’t do. Naming a problem is not the same as providing a solution. There is sound research evidence to show that with systematic, explicit and carefully monitored instruction, all the problems described above can be ameliorated, if not eliminated.

We have put together a workshop that bridges the gap between this research and classroom practice. As well as looking at how different interventions can meet different needs, we also look at specific classroom strategies for your adolescent struggling readers.

If you are looking for ways to give practical support to struggling readers, you can find out more about our one-day workshops here. (Please note – places are limited.)

You may also be interested in:

Looking Past the Masks

It’s Not Too Late

Reading Is Knowledge

Why is there a reading problem in secondary schools?

2 Comments

  1. Pingback: The Loneliness of the Literacy Coordinator | thinkingreadingwritings

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